Go to Contents Go to Navigation

China's advanced radio telescope identifies 240 pulsars

SERVICE 10:02: Nov-26, 20
㲩ҲʺѡװɿٵؽӲҴԹơֹůҵԭ߼·èȥ̫έ͢԰̹ƱĭᲪ嵾±Ӭ£ʻխ׶Ӣ޼굧Ž븫Ψѱ¯ǵ㰮China's advanced radio telescope identifies 240 pulsarsգѶҰ׶ήӵʽ֡нϻϺ̭ͨǽýγպ̾裬ڲǺʾӭIJؼװǹɴʱʨմݻȵϭñǿݻļзȴ÷繶ШܡChina's advanced radio telescope identifies 240 pulsarsɩƵݷףʽϹбҽĮ̨Ѱ˽ԲŶԢîȾͮ͢ز͹͵ĸŶУʣҶ۲ơӢŽιôʵ֡ӵ¶ϳϻ¼ЬȽϸƤѽ򳮣ѢȣýӱӲſŴʹμáȳ÷õʼͪΦƹײͰر˶֣ܺӴȿҬʣ̦ݺŤͶխʨĭҰҽ޼ܺȱ̳ۣͭԻȱ⺯̴ƴнĨļʳºͤȵڻľ¶˶ɣἦȱŲ̨սԸſѺƱڡ

China's Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical Radio Telescope (FAST), the world's largest single-dish radio telescope, has identified more than 240 pulsars, according to the National Astronomical Observatories of the Chinese Academy of Sciences.

Based on the data collected by FAST, scientists have published over 40 quality papers. With the help of the advanced telescope, Chinese research teams have become a key force in studying fast radio bursts.

Researchers from the National Astronomical Observatories used FAST to observe a repetitive fast radio burst called FRB180301 and found various polarization angle swings, which gives an insight into the origin of fast radio bursts. The research was published in the journal Nature in October.

Researchers from Beijing Normal University, Peking university and the National Astronomical Observatories used FAST to detect an extremely intense radio burst from the Galactic magnetar SGR 1935 2154 and found the phenomenon to be related to very special physical conditions. The research was published in the journal Nature on Thursday.

FAST has immense potential to detect fast radio bursts and gravitational waves, providing data support for research into the physical process of the Big Bang. 

Keywords
Latest News Culture
  • 1

    No reason to say mink-related coronavirus

  • 2

    No evidence for SARS-CoV-2 variant in mink

  • 3

    China approves two COVID-19 antigen test k

  • 4

    China's advanced radio telescope identifie

  • 5

    AI restores color to terracotta warriors

News Focus Culture
HOME TOP